The Future of News

Student Perspectives on the State of Journalism

Posts Tagged ‘twitter

Journalists and Twitter: Personal vs. Professional

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[Image via MediaShift]

Julie Posetti has published her results from a study of how journalists are using Twitter. Her findings are very interesting, and can be found in a two part series on MediaShift. Read the rest of this entry »

The Future of News on Twitter

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[Image via Guardian]

You want to keep track of developments in the future of news? Are you looking for new journalistic business models? Want to see who is fighting to keep Journalism alive? Or do you need some helpful tips on digital journalism?

Check out our recommendations for Twitter follows in Digital Journalism and the Future of News!

Written by pc britz

June 9, 2009 at 1:37 pm

News Media Consumption Among Gen Y: Findings

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The audio component of this story can be found here.

Research objectives and a link to the online survey can be found here.

Written By Adam Eucker and Reisha Abolofia

Part One: The Survey

Media is currently undergoing a sweeping transformation.  Due to rapid technological advancements, evolving consumer preferences and a struggling economy, journalists are left asking, “Where is my paycheck?”

To investigate how journalists may earn a living in the future, we decided that the first step is to study an important and emerging demographic: current college-aged students.  This generation of 18 to 24-year-olds can be considered the first generation to have used a computer their entire lives, basically growing up as the Internet established itself as one of the most significant forces on the globe.

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New Technologies involved in the Future of News

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Seattle Coast Guard spokesman, Paul Roszkowski, shares how the Thirteenth District is utilizing new technologies as we enter a new future of journalism.

In Communications 466 – Digital Journalism, we’ve been focusing on new technologies for journalists in the civilian world. Here I’m shifting the focus to technologies being used by our armed forces –particularly the Thirteenth Coast Guard District, a significant component of the Department of Homeland Security.

Based on my interview with Coast Guard spokesman Paul Roszkowski, the Thirteenth District regularly engages in tools like Blogger, Flickr, Youtube and Twitter to tell their story.

By story, Paul means relaying and emphasizing messages of their mission to serve and protect American citizens and the United States’ navigable waterways.  These tools allow them to interact with the Coast Guard community, supporters of the armed forces and keep in touch with mainstream media.

So far, Paul has noticed the Coast Guard has received positive feedback from the public about their presence across the multiple social media technologies.  When asked how effective its been managing all these accounts, he said, “We’re not talking huge numbers, but we are seeing one or two more people daily [following their updates and viewing their sites].”

By:  Sarah Wilhelm

Written by sew28

June 9, 2009 at 1:15 am

The Survival of the Fittest: Online Advertising and Content

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There is no doubt that there is an ability for on-line content to make adequate, and in rare cases, more than adequate revenue. However, on-line media space requires precise and strategic planning.

In the case of advertising and revenue, the success of on-line social media has catapulted its own independent success and has segued to many other parent sites as well. As demonstrated in the info-graphic above, Twitter has parented many other successful subsidiaries.

While the ability of news content to be freely available on-line scares the the typical media employee, the info-graphic above demonstrates on-line content more as an opportunity than a restraint.

The developmental pace of such on-line social media tools has created dependent websites that are able to generate revenue on their own. In this case, Twitter has allowed a space for businesses to have free on-line advertising through consistent tweeting.

Many bloggers have predicted that in the near future there will be paid tweeters and bloggers. However, the conflicting issue for on-line versus print revenue is the mere fact that print involves more key players to be paid – a trend that I believe is the key to success for the on-line social media space.

Written by michvu

June 7, 2009 at 4:31 pm

What Twitter Can Learn From Journalists

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Though they seem to come from opposite ends of the spectrum, there is much that Twitter and professional journalism share. On Mashable, Ann Handley discusses some journalism principles that she learned in school that are well suited for Twitter.

1. Make every word count.
2. Keep it simple.
3. Provide context.
4. Lead with the good stuff.
5. Write killer headlines
6. Graphics expand on the story.
7. People make things interesting.
8. Consider the reader.

Visit Mashable for the embellished list and examples.

Written by pandrewh

June 6, 2009 at 8:14 am

Understanding the future of news

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nickbilton's Flickr picture

nickbilton's Flickr picture

The producers of this blog are a group of college students concerned with the future of news.  As potential journalists, or at least a fresh group of people entering the digital age, we are studying what is to come of our beloved ink-splattered paper.

From what we’ve learned in class (Com 466 Digital Journalism), we are seeing the trickling effects of printed news transitioning to the Internet.  Everything from jobs, to reporting tools, to business models is all being changed and we want to inform the public through our blog.

In the previous post, we used a fun video to distinguish what exactly is going on in journalism – it is a battle between citizen journalism and traditional journalism.

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Written by sew28

June 5, 2009 at 12:12 am