The Future of News

Student Perspectives on the State of Journalism

Posts Tagged ‘academic

Digital Media and a UW Communication Student

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The typical day in the life of a University of Washington Communications student:

-Meeting with advisers
-Internship
-Current job
-Spending hours studying for their 300/400 level classes

It seems like they don’t have the opportunity to stop. Moving ever so swiftly, I managed to sit down with a current communications student at the University of Washington.

For most communications students, their careers could lie anywhere from advertising, human resources, to digital media. Their discipline gives them a sense of flexibility – this could be their best friend or worst enemy. And with the pace of developing technologies, their prospective jobs seem to be in jeopardy.

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Students as News Consumers (Script for Audio)

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[Image via OU]

Written By: Ryan Boulanger
Narrator: Michelle Vu (with slight voice-over editing)

The Internet is changing how people access media. Most news organizations are having trouble adapting to the changes that are taking place. Print newspapers have dominated news media for centuries but now people want their news faster than a daily newspaper can offer.

Johnny Banchero is a junior at the University of Washington and he’s concerned for the future of print newspapers:
“I completely understand where they’re coming from, where everybody’s moving to online formats and no one our age is subscribing anymore, just because it’s not what they use to get their news but there’s so much history in America behind the newspaper. I do personally enjoy the newspaper and having something physically in your hands.”

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WSJ Social Media Policy

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To address the issues of journalists using social media, The Wall Street Journal has issued a list of rules detailing “professional conduct” for their staff. Some of the rules follow (abridged):

  • Never use a false name.
  • Do not use family or friends to promote your work.
  • Contact editor before networking with any contacts who may need to remain confidential.
  • Don’t detail how an article was reported or created.
  • Don’t discuss articles yet to be published.
  • Do not engage in inappropriate dialogue.
  • Separate work from pleasure.

Visit Editor and Publisher for the full list of rules.

Journalism professor Jeff Jarvis responded critically.

This misses the chance to make their reporting collaborative. Of course, they should discuss how an article was made. Of course, they should talk about stories as they in progress. Net natives – as WSJ owner Rupert Murdoch calls them – understand this.

Twitter, blogs, Facebook, etc. also provide the opportunity for reporters and editors to come out from behind the institutional voice of the paper – a voice that is less and less trusted – and to become human. Of course, they should mix business and pleasure.

[via Buzzmachine]